View from Oban Bothy

View from Oban Bothy
Showing posts with label Running. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Running. Show all posts

Saturday, 6 April 2019

Hayfield & New Mills Running, Saturday 23rd March 2019

Well Dear Readers, spring has officially commenced as we assembled at the Lantern Pike at Little Hayfield. 


Spring was definitely some way in the past, however, for the majority of the assemblees, and few of those could even run to a spring in their step. 

It was a fine spring day with plenty of warm sun although a cool breeze. Skint Wilson and Doggie Burston had devised a suburban route to the surprise of the hounds, interspaced with patches of the normal farmland.




The route headed down the road from the hostelry then crossed to Primrose Lane which we followed across Hollingworth Clough then the first part of our wilderness experience led us uphill to pass below Uppercliffe Farm. It then dropped back down to the road, along a bit then down to pass the sewage works and cross the River Sett. 

Just past the reservoir we turned right on the Sett ValleyTrail. This led us along a disused railway all the way to New Mills. Here we entered the Urban part of the run.






At Torr Top we left the trail just after the railway headed through the hill in a closed off tunnel. A brief sojourn through the streets and we arrived back in the river valley just above the confluence of the Goyt and Sett.
It’s an area of industrial history with mills still standing and viaducts across the gorge. It was very picturesque in the sunshine.


We followed the River Goyt for a while, sparkling in the sunshine, then turned left to Goytside Farm. 

It then headed to Beard Hall Farm.
This one was memorable because it was a little dirty and my
new boots suffered a baptism of cow shit. Oh well.

It then led us along an infrequently used path to Brownhill Farm, along the road before starting a long climb up towards Moor Lodge. We were back in the countryside and on normal TallyHo territory.

There were wonderful views of Kinder in the distance and other hills I didn’t recognise as I approached the summit of the run which was marked by a TV mast. It was then downhill, apart from the climb up to Ridge Top, then a sharp descent into Hayfield.


The trail led us through the urban jungle of Hayfield to emerge on the far side and follow Bank Vale Road. It then led us along the track of Middle Fields to emerge on Primrose Lane to then follow the out trail the short way back to the pub.
 

 Catching up with the hares, Doggie Burston and Skint Wislon


Wells the Elder had walked the route due to a damaged toe and was only overtaken by the fast boys and Potter, who looked very trim after his retirement. 

Shortly after my arrival the rest showed up. Bakewell Brown was in the pub having cycled over after getting the time wrong and not making it to the start in time to do the run.

We purchased refreshments and sat down around the tables allotted to us, but the food was some time arriving due to an organisational cock up (we didn’t ask for it) so more refreshments had to be ordered.

Bread arrived and disappeared then a large plate of hotpot. Very good it was too. Potter and Park and Phil had to leave before the Apple Pie arrived. 

The refreshments were consumed, although some had taken the opportunity to refill more often and then we left. 

15 sat for the meal and all left very happily.

Late Taylor Had taken a trip to India in the space between this and the last run and had only arrived back earlier in the morning, but he didn’t let that stop him being on hand to collect the dues.

Where we went:


8.3 miles (ish) with around 1200ft of ascent (and descent).

Words by Wells
Pics by JJ

Monday, 4 February 2019

Running around Rainow, Saturday 2nd Feb 2019



The morning was bright and chilly. Others, probably more accurately, would have said it was bloody freezing.

Runners of different shapes, sizes and ages gathered at the Robin Hood in Rainow, near Macclesfield on the afternoon of Saturday 2nd February.




White Nancy, from the Robin Hood

The car park at the pub was exremely slippy. It was also on a slope and I was warned by the landlady not to park at the top of the slope: the previous day 2 cars, unmanned (or unwomanned), had slid across the car park – on car had gone through the hedge.

Whatever…a couple of hours prior to the massed gathering of knees, Rob McHarry and I had arrived in order to lay a sawdust trail of around 8 miles around the lumpier bits of the area….the clumps of sawdust were (supposed) to be followed by the runners.

We had A Plan….that is to say ROB had A Plan. It was actually a very good plan. So we sort of changed it by going clockwise rather that widdershins as Rob had originally suggested.

Suitably armed with bags of sawdust we set off, well we slipped and slid off the ice rink of a car park, and wandered off north along a quiet lane in the direction of, well, north.

Leaving the relative safety of ice-packed tarmac we turned left to skirt Rainowlow where some brown squiggly lines on the map were crossed.

A short stretch of tarmac at Billinge Head Farm took us to a nice path that skirted the eastern edges of Billinge Quarries.

The Audience



Laying Trail

Turning east, we followed a nice path that descended to Mellow Brook, then up the other side of the valley to Harrop Fold Farm….where I have hazy memories of camping weekends where lots of beer may have been consumed. Or Martini.

I didn’t drink the litre bottle of Martini. It’s not the sort of thing I’d do. Obv.


Harrop Fold Farm

A little more tarmac followed, and very icy it was too. The was little warmth from the sun, but as the track was in the shade anyway it would have made little difference.


Our route slowly changed direction to follow a more south-easterly course.

I was a little concerned that the runners following our carefully planned and even more carefully recced <koff> route might lose the sawdust trail; pale sawdust on bright white snow doesn’t stand out particularly well. We needn’t have worried, although we probably went a bit over the top with the clumps of sawdust, nobody got lost. Well not VERY lost.
 

Another valley crossing followed, this time down to Moss Brook and up the other side by Saddle Cote, this was a bit of a pull and Rob was well ahead of me. In my defence I was taking photographs which slowed me down quite a bit. That’s my story and I’m sticking to it.

It was around about here that Rob spotted a skier doing what skiers do best. Our route turned hard right to follow the skier's tracks.

 Route planner, navigator, trail-layer and runner extraordinaire…


……………and his incapable assistant
 


Ski tracks. And my shadow. Tsk. 
 


Oh, and there were goats too...I almost forgot to mention them


 
Another short stretch of tarmac along Bank Lane and then Ewrin Lane took us to Waggoner’s Brow were another hard right turn delivered into more familiar Turkey Trot country, approaching Lamaload Reservoir.
 


The reservoir dam looked quite spectacular in the freezing temperature, all the buttresses were covered in frost.



A steep descent to cross the infant River Dean, by the waterworks, had me slipping and sliding like a very slippy-slidy thing. But I stayed upright. we continued littering our way in a southerly direction,

It was a bit of a tug up hill. We followed the footpath to the western side of the reservoir to a point just beyond Wickinford Farm. From there we trotted in a south-westerly direction to pass through Valeroyal and very close to the site of the Setter Dog by Walker Barn, and then north by Gulshaw Hollow and Hordern Farm, scattering sawdust trail as we went.


Manchester, with Winter Hill beyond

We crossed the icy Berristall Road and descended steeply to the bottom of the valley before climbing equally steeply to pass by Thornsett Farm.


The going became very easy (easy = gently downhill). The Robin Hood hove into view and after another slippy – slidy adventure across the ice rink of a car park we made it back to our cars.




14 runners sat down to enjoy an excellent meal of beef stew followed by fruit crumble and custard….lots of fattening stodge, just what’s needed after a cold day in the hills.

The day was marred by the news of John Potter’s car suffering the same fate as the sliding cars of the previous day. His unmanned car ended up colliding with two other cars in the car park. John, understandably brassed off with what had happened, didn’t stick around for the run.

My thanks to Rob for letting me ‘help’, and for his good company of course….and to Wells the Elder for buggering off to Brazil so creating a temporary Trail-layer vacancy.

GPS track of where we went (clockwise from Rainow):

Around 8.5 miles / 2,000ft of ascent. And descent. Obv.



Created in Blogger, because Google / Blogger have done something to stop Open Live Writer communicating with it.



 


Thursday, 27 December 2018

Tally-Ho! Turkey Trot, 27th December 2018

The Club’s Hon Sec has been a bit under the weather of late so it was deemed that this year’s Turkey Trot be run close to his home so he could come out to see us, drink beer and join us for the post-run nosh.

The chosen venue was the Olde Number Three pub in Little Bollington, a pub that has had mixed fortunes of late but now seems to be well and truly back on it’s feet, serving good beer and good food at very sensible prices.

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As a local lad, and having some knowledge of the countryside around the pub, I volunteered to plot, plan and lay trail. This entailed a 9am start….not the best plan for the day after Boxing Day….but there you go.

The route headed south following footpaths that crossed the odd stream and muddy patch. So far so good.

At the M56 the sawdust trail was laid East to pick up farm tracks, the tarmac of Reddy Lane and yet more tracks and tarmac…it’s a good job that the TT isn’t a candidate for Trail of the Season!

The trail led across fields and some seriously gloopy man-eating fetid swamps to the the familiar sight (for those who did the P2P a couple of years ago) of the Swan with Two Nicks.

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The pub was closed (Boo!) and the paths leading north into Dunham Park were quiet. The River Bollin weir was roaring well, testament to the recent rainfall:

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A couple of National Trust warden types were curious as to what I was up to, I explained and they seemed happy enough….actually they were mildly amused by the whole thing. It’s good to leave folk smiling!

Continuing NE through the now busy deer park (busy with visitors and deer) the trail eventually crossed Charcoal Road by the gated lodge entrance to enter the Dunham Golf Club which is conveniently criss-crossed by a number of footpaths. Laying trail here was a little difficult, I was trying to be inconspicuous….I don’t think my efforts were successful.

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We went the other way….


Emerging in Dunham Town the sawdust led northwards to pick up the Duke’s Cut and then into Dunham Woodhouses. Just short of The Vine (Sam Smith’s, £2 / pint) the trail went south….well it turned left anyway. The ground was a bit soggy and damp here, the route crossed a couple of streams (Agden Brook being one of them) and the River Bollin – by way of a footbridge.

At Agden Bridge Farm the route again joined the Bridgewater Canal towpath, this time heading east.

It may have been a little disconcerting to the hounds to be passing the Olde Number Three on the opposite bank of the canal and with no apparent means of crossing to it…..not without getting feet and other bits wet.

A solution to this little problem soon presented itself close to Little Bollington, a tunnel under the canal.

Splodging (uphill….please note!) through a field of horses the hounds were soon racing (?) westwards along the opposite side of the canal and the final run in to the pub.

Big Ian, camera in hand, was waiting at the pub……he’d not been out on the run but wanted to join us for lunch.

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Only one hare today

Runners began appearing – Hon Prez Park being first man in, no doubt driven by thirst and hunger:

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Other runners appeared, running on t’other side of the canal but visible from the pub car park. Cameras were readied to record their auspicious arrival:

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It should learn to calm down…


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The Trail-Layer doing his post-run stretch

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Whalley had collected and transported the Hon Sec to the pub where we all enjoyed a beer (maybe more), a nice meal and, far more importantly, good chat with Brian – who seemed to be on good form.

It was a good run. I measured it at 8.8 miles with around 300 – 330ft of ascent, so not the hilliest of trails. Having said that, looking through the Club’s history it would appear that the route covered traditional Tally-Ho! terrain and so it was considered to be acceptable.

Turkey Trot 2018

Thanks to everyone who turned out to make it a successful day for the Club, and especially for Brian.


Photos by JJ and Big Ian

Anchor Inn session

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